saving lives with a camera


I recently ran across this short video showing photographer Portia Shao shooting at her local animal shelter. It includes a great testimonial from the assistant manager of the shelter describing the effect that good photography has made on their adoptions.  Please share the video!  And be sure and look at the lighting setup. For those of you using studio lights, she gives a good look at light placement and backgrounds.  Enjoy!

Point. Shoot. Save a life!


Looks like a great new point & shoot camera is hitting the market, the Samsung EX2F.  This compact camera looks like a great choice for animal rescue photography.

Why?  Two different types of image stabilization (great for maintaining sharpness in low light conditions) –fast 1.4 lens and a great zoom range.  AND lots of megapixels (12.4) and good video options, too.   If you’re frustrated with the results you’ve been getting from your current compact digital camera, but you’re not willing to jump in to the world of expensive and sometimes complicated DSLRs, check this one out.  At $499 it’s well-priced for all the power and features.

I can’t wait to test one out!

Product Highlights

  • 12.4Mp Resolution
  • 3.0″ AMOLED Display
  • 1/1.7″ BSI CMOS Sensor
  • 3.3x Optical Zoom, 12x Digital
  • 5.2-17.2mm Zoom Lens (24-80mm)
  • Full HD 1920 x 1080 Video Recording
  • Dual Optical/Digital Image Stabilization
  • Dual Capture: Simultaneous Photo/Video
  • Smart Camera: Wi-Fi Sharing, Backup, etc
  • Creative Movie Maker Software Included

Saving dogs with a camera | Pit Bull puppies


I have a very talented friend named Erin.  She is a world class musician by day, and by night and weekends she is an animal lover and rescue volunteer extraordinaire.  I’m writing about her because even though she is not a professional photographer, she has found a way to use her photos to save dogs.  She does cell phone photos and videos of the dogs she rescues –and they’re adorable– but recently she has been using her cell phone to tell a story.

A story of two abandoned pit bull puppies. So young that they had to be bottle fed around the clock by Erin and one of her students until they could eat on their own.  When she first started posting their photos on facebook I thought “How clever! Let’s show everyone how cute pibble puppies are!” Now, as the puppies turn 6 weeks old, I’m just shaking my head in amazement. It seems like the whole facebook world has fallen in love with “the girls” and not because of any fancy photography or media exposure –just one very clever, passionate animal lover and her cell phone.  Everyone has seen these two adorable sisters grow from wiggly little spotted THINGS, to lovable, adoptable dogs. And no one who looks at these photos is going to think of them as mean, dangerous, damaged or undesirable.  All because my friend introduced them to the world and let us all watch them grow.

So here’s the beautiful, simple lesson: one person and one cell phone camera can make a huge difference. Not just for two dogs, but for all animal shelters overrun with puppies, and for all families fostering pit bulls and for animal rescue in general.  So don’t get discouraged if your photos don’t look like museum quality art — just tell a story and show the world how much joy there is in saving a dog’s life.  Erin has been nominated as a PET HERO. If she wins, she will donate the money one of her favorite animal rescue charities. Read her story here: https://apps.facebook.com/offerpop/Contest.psp?c=136923&u=29960&a=254553244581393&p=187932427898496&v=Entry&id=409048&rest=1

pet photography saves lives

Erin with puppies then and now

focus on rescue
Pibble sisters at 6 weeks