pet photography

Pet photography | How to photograph rescue pets


pet photography workshop

Announcing our next webinar! Monday, February 20th  at 11am Central time.  This is the President’s Day holiday for many people, so hopefully it will be a great time to relax in front of your computer with a cup of tea and take a class.

Read more about the class by clicking  “sign up: webinars” (above).  Sign up here:  https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=49FXPURZUEW72

Saving Dogs | Teresa Berg Photography


These are the emails I love to get:

“Hi Teresa!

Just wanted to let you know Casper and Ginger were adopted tonight to a wonderful family!! After a week of having your pictures up I have gotten 3 applications for them! That’s amazing as I had not had but two apps in five months for the two! 🙂

Thank you sooooo much for what you are doing! It DOES work!

Stacy”

teresa berg photography

Casper and Ginger were a bonded pair. Ginger was Casper’s guide dog, and as many of you know, it’s really difficult to find a home that will take two dogs. But they got lucky. So I’m posting their adoption portrait. They’re my happy ending of the week!

Dog Rescue Photography | webinars


I’ve had a few dozen questions about what class materials will be available after the webinar and the answer is:  we will be emailing a pdf of notes to all webinar participants the day after the webinar.

The class notes (without the class) don’t give the whole picture, in my opinion. So we’re not furnishing them to people that have not attended the webinar. Diagrams and bullet points are an easy way for some people to learn but not for everyone.

So please attend the webinar if you can, but if you can’t, we’ll keep you posted on this blog for some sort of follow up materials.  We have only a few seats left in the Thursday evening class and about 20 seats left in tomorrow’s class.  Thanks!

dallas dog photography teresa berg

Helping a Black Dog Find a Home | Animal Rescue Photography


“There’s not a lot of that type of statistics on many aspects of sheltering,” says Kim Intino, the director of animal sheltering issues for the Humane Society of the United States. “But I think that every person that has worked in a shelter can attest that in shelters animals with black coats can be somewhat harder to adopt out — or to even get noticed.”

Even after a year had passed at a Los Angeles animal shelter, no one had noticed Estelle. Except, of course, for the staff; they fawned over the big black dog and her gentle demeanor. They started letting Estelle roam the office during the day, which let one couple see her in action — outside her cage and calmly interacting with people. They fell for her, and took her home.

But not every black dog is lucky enough to get that kind of special attention, says Madeline Bernstein, the president of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in Los Angeles.


“They’re the hardest to adopt out, they’re in the shelters the longest and therefore, they’re most likely to be euthanized if nothing happens,” Bernstein says. (Breeders don’t tend to face this problem at the level that shelters do, simply because they have fewer animals to deal with than a city shelter that takes strays in every day.)

Bernstein has plenty of theories about why people might not want black dogs in animal shelters. It’s mostly an unconscious thing, she says, which may explain why black cats have the same problems finding a home. People who are aware of superstitions about black cats (don’t let them cross your path!) may also be unconsciously harboring superstitions about black dogs.